Wild Mushroom Information


Visit our recipe page for ideas on how to cook with wild mushrooms!

Common Name

Scientific Name

Season

Mushroom

 Morel

 Morchella spp.

 April-June/July


 Gold Chanterelle

 Cantharellus cibarius

 August-December  

Lobster 
 

 August-December

Chicken of the       Woods       

 Laetiporus sulphureus

 August-October

 Hen of the Woods

 Grifola frondosa 

 September-October

 Porcini

 Boletus edulis

 September-November & short spring season

 Cauliflower

 Sparassis radicata

October - November

 Matsutake

 Armillaria ponderosa 

 November-January

 Truffles

 Tuber spp.

 November-February

 

 Black Trumpet

 Craterellus cornocopioides 

 December-February

 Hedgehog

 Dentinum

 December-February

 Yellowfoot Chanterelle

 Cantharellus xanthopus

 December-February

We stock locally harvested giant puffball (yes, that is a penny), fiddlehead ferns from Maine during their May season and ramps which are also known as wild leeks.

* * *

     Wild mushrooms are harvested each year during their respective seasons. Wild mushrooms can be harvested in wooded areas all over the world, however caution needs to be exercised when picking mushrooms for consumption. It is estimated that there may be 25-35 poisonous mushrooms out of the many thousand kinds of mushrooms that grow wild. Some mushrooms cause stomach flu, cramps, diarrhea, vomiting or nausea and others may be fatal. It is very important that wild mushrooms be identified by a certified wild mushroom expert. Forest Mushrooms has been a certified licensed wild mushroom specialist since 1992.

The Retail Food Protection Program Information Manual distributed by the MN Department of Agriculture states:

    Wild mushrooms are not to be sold or served through a retail establishment unless they have been individually inspected and determined to be safe by a specialist acceptable to the regulatory authority. Records which establish that all wild mushrooms were appropriately inspected must be retained by the operator for six (6) months.


Poster used under North American Mycological Association guidelines for educational purposes.


For more information on mushroom poisonings you can visit the North American Mycological Association website. There is a good deal of information regarding symptoms, number of yearly cases and other educational information.

The following link is a list of wild mushroom identifiers for various states: http://www.sph.umich.edu/~kwcee/mpcr/


[ Home | About Us | Products | Additional Product Information | Distributors | Mushroom Facts | Wilds & Poisoning | Folklore | Recipes | Español | Mushrooms & Medicine | Contact Us ]